24th District Court     


 

Traffic and Criminal Division

 

Hours of Operation
Traffic and Criminal Division
Misdemeanor Violations
Felony Cases

 


Hours of Operation

The Traffic and Criminal Division of the court is responsible for traffic tickets as well as criminal violations and is open Monday through Thursday from 8:30 AM until 5:30 PM and Fridays from 8:30 AM until 4:30 PM.  You can reach this department by calling (313) 928-0535 x 225 or x 226.

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Civil Infractions

Your ticket states the violation for which you were cited.  In the column preceding the offense, the type of violation is designated either C/I (for Civil Infraction) or Misd (for Misdemeanor).  

A civil infraction is a criminal offense which may result in fines and costs being assessed against you, but there is no jail time associated with the violation.  The Secretary of State may also issue points against your driver's license for a civil infraction.  The amount of money due on your violation as well as any points to be assessed on your license can be found by checking the fine and cost schedule on the back of the ticket.

If you have received a civil infraction ticket, you have the following options:

1.  Admit Responsibility

You may pay the ticket in full and accept points (if any) added to your record by the Secretary of State.  This may be done by mail, as explained on the back of your ticket (only personal checks and money orders will be accepted).  If you choose to appear in person at the court to make payment, you may pay by cash, personal check, money order or credit card (Visa or MasterCard).

2.  Admit Responsibility with Explanation

This is an acknowledgement that the ticket was proper, but you believe that you have a legitimate excuse.  You may explain your reason to the judge or magistrate.  

Presiding Judge

24th District Court

6515 Roosevelt Road

Allen Park, MI   48101-2524

 

3.  To Deny Responsibility and Schedule an informal or formal hearing.  

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Misdemeanor Violations

Payable Misdemeanors

If you received a misdemeanor ticket in either Allen Park or Melvindale, check on the ticket to determine whether it is a payable offense or if it requires a court appearance.  Examples of payable misdemeanors are no operator's license on person, expired operator's license, expired registration plate, improper registration plate and no motorcycle endorsement.  If you are not sure whether an offense is payable or not, please check the Fine and Cost Schedule adopted by the 24th District Court.  If you are still unsure whether your misdemeanor ticket is payable, you can call the court to find out. 

1.  Plead Guilty - Pay the fine / court costs and accept all other penalties assessed.

2.  Plead Not Guilty - You must schedule an arraignment by calling the court.  At the arraignment, the magistrate or judge will inform you of the charged offense and the possible penalties which can be imposed.  You have the right to have an attorney present for all court proceedings.  You may then enter a guilty plea, not guilty plea or stand mute.  If you plead not guilty or stand mute, a pre-trial date will be set.  If you plead guilty, you will not have a trial and the case will be set for sentencing.

Standard Misdemeanors (Not Payable)

If you have received a misdemeanor ticket which is not payable, and thus requires a court appearance, you must call the court within five (5) days to schedule a court date.  Some examples of misdemeanors which require a court date are driving on a suspended / restricted / revoked license, possession of a controlled substance  and consumption of alcohol by a person under the age of 21.

Your case will then be set for arraignment, at which time you have the option of pleading guilty, not guilty or standing mute.  If your guilty plea is accepted by the court, the case will be set for a sentencing hearing.  For a plea of not guilty or if you stand mute (which will result in the court entering a plea of not guilty on your behalf), the case will be set for a pre-trial hearing.

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  Felony Cases

A felony offense is one where the maximum penalty exceeds one year in jail and/or a thousand dollar fine.  Jurisdiction for these cases falls to the 3rd Circuit Court for Wayne County.  The first court appearance in these cases, however, will occur at the 24th District Court.

Arraignment - This is the first contact a defendant charged with a felony has with the court system.  At this time, you will be formally informed of the charge against you and the possible penalties for conviction.  Unlike misdemeanor arraignments, you may not plead guilty to the charges at this stage in the proceedings.  The judge will set a date for your preliminary examination at this time, which will occur within 14 days of the arraignment.  The judge will also set your bond at the arraignment.

Bond - Except as otherwise provided by law, a person accused of a criminal offense is entitled to bail.  The Eighth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution prohibits "excessive" bail.  Bonds are uniform regardless of whether the accused posts it on their own or uses a surety.  In fixing the amount of bail, the court considers and makes findings on the record of the seriousness of the offense charged, how much the public needs to be protected, the previous criminal record / dangerousness of the person accused and the probability of the person appearing at trial.

Preliminary Examination - Following the arraignment, a date will be set for the preliminary examination.  At the preliminary examination, the judge will determine whether there is probable cause that the crime in question was committed and that the particular crime was in fact committed by the accused.  If these questions are answered by the court in the affirmative, the case will be bound over for trial at the 3rd Circuit Court in Detroit.  If not, the charges may be reduced or dismissed.

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